Scarlett Cibilich

Harry Culy

Ayesha Green

Lucy O’Doherty

Moniek Schrijer

Kāryn Taylor

Christopher Ulutupu

Erica van Zon

Denys Watkins

Artworks in Homes


Jessie & Jack, Wellington, NZ

"I first saw Alan Ibell's work at Sanderson Gallery when I was in University. I was unable to afford it, but the painting stuck with me. Three or four years later I messaged Alan on Instagram and asked if he still had the piece and it was great luck that I was able to purchase it from him..."


Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes

Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes

Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes

"I first saw Alan Ibell's work at Sanderson Gallery when I was in University. I was unable to afford it, but the painting stuck with me. Three or four years later I messaged Alan on Instagram and asked if he still had the piece and it was great luck that I was able to purchase it from him, the last of the series with one of the vessels repainted — he said the original had never sat right with him.

"The few pieces I've collected with Jack, my partner, are mostly NZ Artists and there is always a story or connection we feel with the works. We have a rule that we don't buy something unless we want to use or sit with it for life — or life as far as we can see it so far. That's why items and works with narratives are so important, from our dinner plates by Paul Melser to the origin of our kitchen table — which was my mum and dads first piece of furniture they bought together. I don't know any of the artists personally (except for the photograph by Ch'lita Collins), so a lot of the story comes from getting to know the artists over time through their collections of work and social media. I enjoy reading Alan's synopses — like collection blurbs of each new exhibition he puts out, particularly the idea that each new series is a chapter in a world he is building that contains dark and light dimensions and characters that pop up here and there. I could be way off in that description, but the whole concept gives the viewer so much space to write their own story. Where is the figure in our little painting with the house going? Are they escaping or trying to get inside? Where does the door lead to? What's in the envelope? In a way, the whole series feels like a bit of a meditation.

"The Matt Arbuckle works speak more to my background in fashion and textiles. Colour leads my own work and as soon as I saw 'Resistors (2019),' which sits above the fireplace I remember it making me feel joyful. The composition and colours play off each other and sometimes you can see images in them depending on the time of day or the way the light is shining — sort of like clouds.

"The places our pieces have landed in our space aren't yet final — we've just moved into our new home and it feels like a bit of a rabbit warren with lots of small rooms. It's nice to consider the artworks and where they will land once we make changes. There's a Reg Mombassa drawing of Wellington Harbour sitting on top of our fridge in the kitchen that is definitely in need of a much more deserving home, somewhere that will reflect and contribute to its narrative."