Scarlett Cibilich

Harry Culy

Ayesha Green

Lucy O’Doherty

Moniek Schrijer

Kāryn Taylor

Christopher Ulutupu

Erica van Zon

Denys Watkins

Artworks in Homes


Heather, Wellington, NZ

" Art can be seen as an extravagance, but for me it is a core part of life, not just because I have been working in the field for such a long time (i.e. I have skin in the game), but because it matters. It fuels and enriches our lived experience. It connects us to generations past and its fingers reach well into the future. I have a strangely close and complicated bond with objects and art works."


Moniek Schrijer, Surface no. 12, 2019

"The last few years I have been buying primarily work made by women. The neck piece by Moniek Schrijer, Surface no. 12, 2019 is made of copper, vintage Czechoslovakian glass gemstones, patina paint, and cotton cord. It is big for a neck piece but relatively small when hanging on a wall. I wear it and sometimes hang it, and often have it safely tucked away in a stack of jewellery boxes. I have a jewellery problem...."


Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes

Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes

Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes

Erica van Zon, Avocado and Egg, 2018

"Erica’s work sits alongside an abstracted landscape painting by France-based British artist Sam Basu (who co-founded with Liz Murray a great initiative in rural France called Treignac Project), a collage work by Sam Norton (who graduated from the MFA programme at the College of Creative Arts Toi Rauwharangi a few years ago), and a print by Michel Tuffery (chosen because of its letterform, the two whales making up the letter W, for Winnie my daughter...."


Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes

Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes

Caitlin Devoy

"The small sculptural work is by Caitlin Devoy, also a graduate of the MFA programme....I got it at one of the ace annual fundraisers for ENJOY Public Art Gallery and have always loved its wry wit and distinct absurdity...."


Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes


"As a curator and educator I work with art and artists and have done in various ways since I graduated art school way back in the early 1990s. Since I was about 16 art is always been a very big part of my life, and I never fail to be curious about, and attentive to it, even in times of global pandemics. If anything, I look at the work that is on my walls (especially during lock down) with fresh eyes. My temporary work station is set up in the dining room where Erica van Zon’s Avocado and Egg (2018) sits in a cluster of works. I find this work funny, charming and beautiful and I bought it because eggs are really big in our household and I thought the whole family would enjoy it. Some of my other choices don’t have universal household appeal!

Erica’s work sits alongside an abstracted landscape painting by France-based British artist Sam Basu (who co-founded with Liz Murray a great initiative in rural France called Treignac Project), a collage work by Sam Norton (who graduated from the MFA programme at the College of Creative Arts Toi Rauwharangi a few years ago), and a print by Michel Tuffery (chosen because of its letterform, the two whales making up the letter W, for Winnie my daughter. It was meant to hang in her bedroom but I like seeing it down here every day). The small sculptural work is by Caitlin Devoy, also a graduate of the MFA programme and whose work has been shown at Jhana Millers gallery previously. I got it at one of the ace annual fundraisers for ENJOY Public Art Gallery and have always loved its wry wit and distinct absurdity.

The last few years I have been buying primarily work made by women. The neck piece by Moniek Schrijer Surface no. 12, 2019 is made of copper, vintage Czechoslovakian glass gemstones, patina paint, and cotton cord. It is big for a neck piece but relatively small when hanging on a wall. I wear it and sometimes hang it, and often have it safely tucked away in a stack of jewellery boxes. I have a jewellery problem. It is one of the things I semi-compulsively collect (along with art works and books, and more recently due to Winnie’s influence, mermaids, unicorns and princess-related paraphernalia).

I recognise being able to collect stuff is a privilege and while the purchases I make are usually pretty modest in scale and slow (paid off in instalments), they all become things that enrich our daily environment, and provoke conversations and sometimes heated disagreements. My partner thinks I am mad. He is not a collector of things, he is not convinced by the impulse to have more of something than is actually needed (where need is predominantly associated with utility). Art can be seen as an extravagance, but for me it is a core part of life, not just because I have been working in the field for such a long time (i.e. I have skin in the game), but because it matters. It fuels and enriches our lived experience. It connects us to generations past and its fingers reach well into the future. I have a strangely close and complicated bond with objects and art works. They have a presence, a narrative and a life-force that keeps pulling me back in, not always in a comfortable way. Obsession is definitely part of collecting (and I would argue, curating)."