Scarlett Cibilich

Harry Culy

Ayesha Green

Jaime Jenkins

Lucy O’Doherty

Moniek Schrijer

Kāryn Taylor

Christopher Ulutupu

Erica van Zon

Denys Watkins

Artworks in Homes


Simon & Caroline, Wellington, NZ

Jaime Jenkins, Pillar (oval), 2019

"Jaime Jenkins' ceramic work was first seen sitting alone, glinting in the sun, in Jhana's large well lit gallery. It is now in our house with trees, harbour, hills and city as backdrop. It is solid and very heavy, and shaped like an old-fashioned tin. I've been told we can sit on it — but haven't dared to yet. What I love best is its grainy, black speckled, volcanic like glaze and its soft worn looking green colour. It glints too at home, and looks like part of the world beyond our windows has just dived in."


Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes

Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes


Caroline McQuarrie, Homewardbounder #07, 2014

"Caroline McQuarrie is a friend and works at Massey’s College of Creative Arts. Her photography is very much in the social documentary camp. It oozes substance and history. She is inventive, thoughtful and knowledgeable: her works on which she embroiders words and images are really memorable. The work we have is aesthetically lovely — beautiful greens and browns, with purple rocks and a painterly quality — the turquoise leaves looks like they have been painted on."


Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes

Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes


Scarlett Cibilich, Bora, 2019

"Scarlett’s work has been hung in our living room by art installer Rob Cherry, and it is clever place to put it. It riffs off the Albert Irvin in the kitchen, holds its own against the very large two Giovanni Intra works close by, and just nails the space it is in. She is very talented and it is a gorgeous work."


Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes

Jhana Millers Art Gallery Wellington Artworks in Homes


"The Scarlett Cibilich painting is small (300 mm x 250mm). It is acrylic and varnish on a wood panel. The wood panel is bog standard plywood, with a hole in the side, and looks like it has had a previous life. The work is mostly reds and yellows. It is definitely painterly – there is a drip that goes round the side, and you can almost feel the brush marks that Scarlett has made, and hear her making them. Although an abstract painting, it seems to me to have a strong figurative element to it. The best bits are on the edges at the top and around the sides. The main painting starts about 1 cm below the top, revealing a gorgeous bit of multiple levels of paint. Scarlett’s work has been hung in our living room by art installer Rob Cherry, and it is clever place to put it. It riffs off the Albert Irvin in the kitchen, holds its own against the very large two Giovanni Intra works close by, and just nails the space it is in. She is very talented and it is a gorgeous work.

Caroline McQuarrie is a friend and works at Massey’s College of Creative Arts. Her photography is very much in the social documentary camp. It oozes substance and history. She is inventive, thoughtful and knowledgeable: her works on which she embroiders words and images are really memorable. The work we have is aesthetically lovely - beautiful greens and browns, with purple rocks and a painterly quality — the turquoise leaves looks like they have been painted on. And it is large. If Scarlett’s work shows the power that a small work can have, Caroline’s shows that sometimes big photos taken well are hard to beat. The work engenders a sense of place, and time, and of hard lives lived by those wanting to survive and prosper. There is a connection: this is a shot of an abandoned mine shaft. My great-grandfather was a gold miner in Lawrence, and he is buried there. Lawrence — after the town, not Arabia — was my father’s name and is my middle name.

Caroline's Homewardbounder hangs next to Michael Parekowhai's Ed Brown. I like these two photographs together because they strangely look like a pair, not so much in terms of flora and fauna, but because of the size being roughly the same and an orange/green contrast happening. It is serendipitous, as this was the only space left to hang Caroline's work!

Jaime Jenkins' ceramic work was first seen sitting alone, glinting in the sun, in Jhana's large well lit gallery. It is now in our house with trees, harbour, hills and city as backdrop. It is solid and very heavy, and shaped like an old-fashioned tin. I've been told we can sit on it - but haven't dared to yet. What I love best is its grainy, black speckled, volcanic like glaze and its soft worn looking green colour. It glints too at home, and looks like part of the world beyond our windows has just dived in."

We have a collection, in the sense that we have more art than wall space, and all three works from Jhana are really wonderful additions to it. Ours is a haphazard collection; we buy art that we like and that we have a connection to. That can be because we know the artist, because we know the gallery owner, or because the work reminds of a place, event or time. We have works by Denys Watkins, who Jhana represents. He is a friend of ours. One of Denys’s works, which is in the living room, depicts a 10 legged, 10 armed rabbit bowling a severed head over a pile of cow dung. So not too unusual. It is called Googly, and is derived from his residency in India — we saw him a few times during that as we were living there. Like me, Denys is nuts on sport. He is a rugby and golf tragic. His series on the Kabul golf course, shown at 30Upstairs, was terrific. I think Caroline still regrets not buying all. We have several works by Monique Redmond, who is a friend and just a wonderful artist (and person). They are grouped in the Redmond corner downstairs! And we have a large, fantastic work by Simon Morris, also at Massey (as is Shaun Waugh, whose photo is in the living room). I first met Simon when in London in 1990. I had to organise an exhibition of young New Zealand artists as part of New Zealand’s sesquicentenary, and luckily found Derek Cowie to curate it. He now has a studio about fifteen feet away from Jhana’s gallery. I drink beer with Simon. Small world."